• Course Description taken from the 2015 Social Studies Standards of Learning.  This is a description of the information that will be presented during the course of the semester.  Additional information, notes, review information, etc., can be found at my WH2 Webpage:

    CSDavis WH2 Webpage

     World History and Geography: 1500 a.d. (c.e.) to the Present

    These standards enable students to examine history and geography from 1500 a.d. (c.e.) to the present, with emphasis on development of the modern world. Geographic influences on history will continue to be explored, but increasing attention will be given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nations. Significant attention will be given to the ways in which scientific and technological revolutions created new economic conditions that in turn produced social and political changes. Noteworthy people and events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries will be emphasized for their strong connections to contemporary issues.

     

    Although the study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas, historical understanding requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. Students will apply these social science skills to engage in their exploration of the global challenges of the twenty-first century.

     Skills

    WHII.1  The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

    1. a) synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
    2. b) using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
    3. c) interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
    4. d) evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
    5. e) comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
    6. f) explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
    7. g) analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
    8. h) using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
    9. i) identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
    10. j) investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

     WHII.2  The student will apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 a.d. (c.e.) by

    1. a) locating major states and empires;
    2. b) describing artistic, literary, and intellectual ideas of the Renaissance;
    3. c) describing the distribution of major religions;
    4. d) analyzing major trade patterns; and
    5. e) citing major technological and scientific exchanges in the Eastern Hemisphere.

    Emergence of a Global Age, 1500 to 1800 a.d. (c.e.)

    WHII.3  The student will apply social science skills to understand the Reformation in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

    1. a) explaining the effects of the theological, political, and economic differences that emerged, including the views and actions of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth I;
    2. b) describing the impact of religious conflicts, the Inquisition, and the Catholic Reformation on society and government actions; and
    3. c) describing how the Reformation led to changing cultural values, traditions, and philosophies, and assessing the role of the printing press.

     WHII.4  The student will apply social science skills to understand the impact of the European Age of Exploration by

    1. a) explaining the political and economic goals of European exploration and colonization;
    2. b) describing the geographic expansion into Africa, Asia, and the Americas;
    3. c) comparing and contrasting the social and cultural influences of European settlement on Africa, Asia, and the Americas;
    4. d) analyzing how competition for colonies changed the economic system of Europe; and
    5. e) defining and describing how the Scientific Revolution led to social and technological changes that influenced the European view of the world.

     WHII.5  The student will apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in Europe and Russia from about 1500 A.D. (C.E) to about 1800 A.D. (C.E) by

    1. a) locating European nations and their empires in time and place and identifying major geographic features of Europe;
    2. b) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in the Hapsburg empire, with emphasis on Charles V;
    3. c) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in France, with emphasis on the Age of Absolutism, Louis XIV, and the Enlightenment period;
    4. d) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in Great Britain, with emphasis on the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution and their impacts on democracy;
    5. e) explaining the causes and effects of the American and French Revolutions;
    6. f) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in the German states;
    7. g) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in the Italian states; and
    8. h) describing the development of social and cultural patterns in Russia, with emphasis on Peter the Great.

     WHII.6  The student will apply social science skills to understand the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in Asia from about 1500 A.D. (C.E) to about 1800 A.D. (C.E) by

    1. a) locating Asian empires in time and place and identifying major geographic features;
    2. b) describing the location and development of social and cultural patterns in the Ottoman Empire;
    3. c) describing the location and development of social and cultural patterns in India, with emphasis on the Mughal Empire and coastal trade;
    4. d) describing the location and development of social and cultural patterns in China, with emphasis on the Qing (Manchu) dynasty;
    5. e) describing the location and development of social and cultural patterns in Japan, with emphasis on the Japanese shogunate; and
    6. f) comparing and contrasting the political and economic systems of Asian empires.

     WHII.7  The student will demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, geographic, and economic conditions in sub-Saharan Africa from about 1500 A.D. (C.E.) to about 1800 A.D. (C.E.) by

    1. a) locating major societies in Africa in time and place and identifying major geographic features;
    2. b) comparing and contrasting the development of social and cultural patterns in East Africa and West Africa;
    3. c) comparing and contrasting the development of social and cultural patterns in Central and Southern Africa; and
    4. d) explaining the development of political and economic systems in African societies.

     Age of Revolutions and Imperialism

    WHII.8  The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

    1. a) explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
    2. b) analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
    3. c) describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
    4. d) assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
    5. e) explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
    6. f) explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

     WHII.9  The student will apply social science skills to understand global interactions between 1800 to about 1900 by

    1. a) locating the United States of America, describing its expansion between 1776 and 1900, and assessing its changing role in the world;
    2. b) locating Latin America, explaining the causes and effects of the revolutions, with emphasis on the contributions of Toussaint L’Ouverture and Simón Bolívar, and identifying the impact of the American and French Revolutions on Latin America;
    3. c) describing the political and social challenges faced by Latin American nations, with emphasis on the Monroe Doctrine;
    4. d) assessing the impact of European colonization and imperialism on Asia, Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Australia; and
    5. e) analyzing the relationship between industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism.

     The Modern Era

    WHII.10 The student will apply social science skills to understand World War I and its worldwide impact by

    1. a) explaining economic and political causes and identifying major leaders of the war, with emphasis on Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II;
    2. b) describing the location of major battles and the role of new technologies;
    3. c) analyzing and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the actions of the League of Nations, with emphasis on the mandate system;
    4. d) citing causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution;
    5. e) explaining the causes and assessing the impact of worldwide depression in the 1930s; and
    6. f) examining the rise of totalitarianism.

     WHII.11 The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact by

    1. a) explaining the major causes of the war;
    2. b) describing the leaders of the war, with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;
    3. c) describing the major events, including major battles and the role of new technologies;
    4. d) examining the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and
    5. e) examining the effects of the war, with emphasis on the terms of the peace, the war crimes trials, the division of Europe, plans to rebuild Germany and Japan, and the creation of international cooperative organizations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).

     WHII.12 The student will apply social science skills to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century by

    1. a) explaining the causes of the Cold War, including the competition between the American and Soviet economic and political systems and the causes of the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe;
    2. b) describing the major leaders and events of the Cold War, including the location of major conflicts;
    3. c) describing conflicts and revolutionary movements in Asia and their major leaders, including Mao Tse-tung (Zedong), Chiang Kai-shek, Deng Xiaoping, and Ho Chi Minh; and
    4. d) examining the political and economic shifts that led to the end of the Cold War, with emphasis on Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, and Ronald Reagan.

     WHII.13 The student will apply social science skills to understand the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts by

    1. a) describing the struggles for self-rule, including Gandhi’s leadership in India and the development of India’s democracy;
    2. b) describing Africa’s independence movements, including Jomo Kenyatta’s leadership of Kenya and Nelson Mandela’s role in South Africa; and
    3. c) describing the end of the mandate system and the creation of states in the Middle East, including the roles of Golda Meir and Gamal Abdel Nasser.

     WHII.14  The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

    1. a) identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
    2. b) assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
    3. c) describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
    4. d) analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

     WHII.15  The student will demonstrate knowledge of the influence of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism in the contemporary world by

    1. a) describing their beliefs, sacred writings, traditions, and customs; and
    2. b) locating the geographic distribution of religions in the contemporary world.
Last Modified on July 1, 2021